3000 Windmills on the Wall

We’re on a planet that is close to its primary and has a molten core, a substantial atmosphere, and a large natural satellite. Any species that can’t develop a sustainable energy infrastructure on such a planet doesn’t deserve to escape its gravity well.

This quote from my friend Shaun Moss tells exactly what it is all about: we could be much worse off.

If that star would be further away solar panels would be useless, without the atmosphere there is no wind, if that core has cooled you can forget geothermal energy and without such a decent size moon like ours tidal power is not an option.

We have it all, so why do we actually still use fossil fuels and nuclear energy?

Land of Windmills

Of the four options mentioned, in the Netherlands especially the wind is an interesting energy source. There’s practically always wind in our country. And unlike Germany, which lies on a bend in the North Sea coast and Belgium, which tapers towards the sea, we have a large piece of the North Sea at our disposal where usually the wind is even stronger.

3000 wind turbines on the North Sea

One and a half years ago I made the  picture above , after reading a newspaper article about the one thousand windmills that, over the course of a decade,  will be placed on the Dutch part of the North Sea. I wondered what that would look like: a thousand windmills; well, it looks like this. If you want to count them: be my guest.

Polluting the horizon?

A good thing, I’d say, those one thousand windmills. But not everyone appears to agree with this. Opponents talk about “pollution of the horizon”. I would rather call it beautification of the horizon.

Okay, I can imagine that you don’t necessarily need such a giant in your backyard. And all right, I can also imagine that there are small-scale landscapes where modern wind turbines are a bit out of place. But they fit the vastness of the sea, don’t they?

And flavors vary, I know, but aren’t wind turbines actually just beautiful? The constantly changing image in various weather conditions, the slenderness of the seemingly one-piece milky steel shafts, the playfulness of countless rotating blades; I certainly see the beauty. And of course it helps that a wind turbine causes no radiation, earthquakes or sea level rise.

By the way, the windmills will be placed at such a distance from the coast that  they can barely be seen from the beach. Maybe the wind farms can be distributed in such a way that there will always be beaches where you don’t see them at all. But in return for that, it would be also nice if at a few places the turbines would be very close to the coast.

3000 wind turbines on the North Sea

I’m afraid a few pictures cannot change the minds of the convinced opponents. Nevertheless, to illustrate the beauty of wind farms at sea, I expanded my Thousand Windmills into a triptych. And I do not rule out that it will grow into to a quin-, sep- or other prime number tych.

Scale elements

The turbines in this visualization are 150 meters tall, including the blades. But you don’t realize how big that really is untill a scale element is added: a maintenance vessel, a sailing yacht or a classic three-master.

3000 wind turbines on the North Sea

Wall decoration

Side by side on the wall the triptych looks like this:

3000 wind turbines on the North Sea

Of course the three thousand windmills can also be viewed, and obtained, in my online gallery at Werk aan de Muur.

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